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 A new and shocking version of Robert Louis Stevenson's classic tale of depravity, lust, love and horror. On the fog-bound streets of Victorian-era London, Henry Jekyll's experiments with exotic "powders and tinctures" have brought forth his other self—Edward Hyde, a sensualist and villain free to commit the sins Jekyll is too civilized to comprehend. When Hyde meets a woman who stirs his interest, Jekyll fears for her life and decides to end his experiments. But Hyde has other ideas, and so the two sides battle each other in a deadly game of cat-and-mouse to determine who shall be the master and who his slave.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher from the novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson and is published by Dramatists Play Service, Inc..

Cast:

Dr. Henry Jekyll - a timid, mildmannered man who believes he has found the cure for all of humanity’s evil, a magic formula

Elizabeth Jelkes - a chamber maid at the local hotel, and Hyde's love interest

The following characters, and extras, are played by an ensemble of 4 characters, who all alternate playing aspects of Hyde

Mr. Edward Hyde - the embodiment of evil that is the actual result of Jekyll’s magic formula.

Gabriel Utterson - a lawyer, loyal friend of Jekyll and Lanyon, puts the play in motion by setting out to discover who the mysterious Edward Hyde is

Dr. H.K. Lanyon - friend and colleague of Dr. Jekyll

Sir Danvers Carew - colleague of Dr. Jekyll, an abusive and misogynistic doctor, he exploits science for his own personal experimentation, he is the exact kind of mad scientist that Dr. Jekyll loathes

Poole, the Butler - Jekyll’s butler, faithful to Jekyll but begins to worry something is amiss with Mr. Hyde

Sanderson, the Private Detective - briefly hired by Jekyll to follow Hyde to learn more information about what Hyde and Elizabeth are up to

The Inspector - Police Inspector who investigates the murder of Danvers Carew

Mr. Richard Enfield - Utterson’s distant relative, tells Utterson about the time he saw Mr. Hyde run over a poor street urchin and insisted that Hyde pay the urchin for the damages